Tag Archives: content management

STC2008 – From Nightclub DJ to Content Management Consultant

Subtitle: Developing a Business Career The Content Wrangler WayScott Abel\'s career path at STC Summit in Philadelphia, June 2008
From the ever entertaining Scott Abel, this was an invigorating session that still kicks you in the butt to get out of your whiney mode and into a winner mode. Sounds cheesy to repeat, but it worked. Here are my notes from the session. I’d love to hear your thoughts and critique on my “live blogging” style – too much information, not enough information, not the right information? Let me know.

Routes to tech comm – English major or developers accidentally become tech writers

scottabel.com – crafted a career – but Scott didn’t grab that URL (he’s obviously not That Scott Abel.:)

He earned 146 credit in four different programs, and didn’t earn a degree
he could get a college degree, but decided not to pay the “fees.”

Still takes classes like knowledge enabled information management – Indiana University 8-5 every day for three days, presentation to 200 people as a capstone, and you fail if you’re late, or don’t play by their rules. But it’s three credit hours.

John Herron school of art in Indianapolis – foundational school – you should have drawing or sculpting skills, though.
Business School, next stop – he lasted one semester, it wasn’t about the answers, it was about how you get the answers – answers are on the back of the syllabus

Next stop, photography – first working with digital photography, won some photography contests by accident.

Journalism school – at Indiana University – and he worked there too. He went to and helped with computer assisted journalism conference. Use computer technology to cull through all the data.

He started in entertainment journalism, friend of Margaret Cho, has interviewed Elton John, other celebs.

Started a local alternative magazine… fun exciting and profitable. Assignment in journalism school – business plan for a magazine… just did the magazine, didn’t do a plan. 72-page monthly publication, two guys with two much time on their hands – sold highscale ads and actually made revenue.

He waited tables to get through school, learning that he could make 200-300 bucks a night, he met influential people. PanAm games, miniature Olypics hosted in Indy, got more experience.

He had the attention span of a worm – didn’t lead to very many opportunities.

Became a bartender – clock in at midnight, clocked out at 3-4 am. But felt he lost time during those “young” years even though he had flexibility and enough money.

Age 14: my first gig as a DJ. Learned how to mix, taught him about content reuse and personalization… wrong song – every one hides like roaches. or perhaps on purpose, when music sucks, beer and drink sales go up.

Wrong song, wrong version of the song. He had a remix of a chitty chitty bang bang that got played on Chicago radio.

Remixes were user-generated, 45s were all they had to work with, they’d buy 2 copies of the single, because they needed songs longer than 3 minutes. So… two turntables and a mixer – had to understand tempo, tone, feel of a song, but tempo control was the key. The Technicas 1200 Turntables are still instrument of choice for many dejays.

Reuse is in the remix… that’s how tracks were laid down… vocals reused identically but combined with different styles of music.

Madonna explained how her voice could be changed, the tools allowed her voice to stretch like a proportional sqaure stretches proportionally when you hold down shift key…

DJ mixing and increasing complexity similar to content choreography that we do with content – the technology is increasingly.

1999 – employment counselor said, you’d be an excellent technical communicator with your skill set.

Put together a portfolio

First job, documenting mortgage loan automation software, $45,000, he could buy groceries, kick out his roomates. Bedazzled by corporate America… benefits, paycheck, vacation.
Had folders called “Betsy’s documents” – totally disorganized, inefficient, wasteful, later they were sued out of business. Their automated software was

Started reading Ann Rockley, Bob Glushko, JoAnn Hackos, all of whom had really good best practices towards fixing the mess of content he was seeing at work.

Ann Rockley sent Scott a draft of her book, Unified Content Strategy, and he became technical editor on the book.

He needed a way to get organized, get away from notes on paper in his backpack, started a blog to be a storage container for his knowledge.

(Side note – I have to enter my “cringe” essays from grad school)

Once he got attention for his blog, he got more people talking to him, asking questions, help solving questions.

Started speaking at events, but then had to define his value proposition. Rebranded himself as a Content Management Strategist.

Tools that can tell management that content is valuable and that the product can’t ship without it. Value proposition can’t circle around their job – content needs to be valued.

Syndicate Conference 2006, encouraged to think bigger. He started commoditizing the site. Conference are a natural extension of what he was writing about, his readers wanted to learn more about what he was writing about.

Presenters seek attention – same folks who speak at conferences write articles and participate in groups.

Need for a community – 1900 members of the Content Wrangler community… there needed to be a way for people to connect to one another without Scott’s help.

Being an individual consultant is not scaleable – and this is good news for you. You can create your own value proposition.

The discipline of Document Engineering – Bob Glushko, no future in commodity writing – the future is in solving content challenges. Structured content, XML, move content around, but not just documents – documents married with data from databases. Opens up a brand new world.

Road to success – don’t allow others to define you, no one right way to become a content management expert.

Questions?
He’ll post to slideshare.net (youtube for ppt)

scribd.com (youtube for pdf) ipaper service

http://thecontentwrangler.ning.com Community site

Harmonizer product – will eventually let you analyze content using web page

acrolinxacrocheck product

How much coding does Scott know?
If you don’t know how to model content, you shouldn’t be coding. You have to be able to analyze content before you model it, even.

What’s next for Scott – providing service designs, such as RSS feeds. Problem solving providing services that give them answers before they ask them. Such as mortgage being due, or governments issuing fishing licenses.

Another question – any certificate programs you’d recommend? None, says Scott. Writing for reuse isn’t part of these certification programs, what about DITA, often focused on tools, not skill differentiators.

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Putting content into context in a wiki – especially in a large environment

An interesting read on the front page of wordpress.com of all places. I enjoy random clicking, and this one came up with a great commentary on the difficulty of using a wiki to get how to information.

From Learning about Second Life from Google:

Over at SL, the main source of information is on the WIKI, which in my opinion has some great information but because Linden primarily lets the users run the show isn’t as helpful as some sort of information clearing house. Trying to sort out how to sculpt, for example, is an exercise in total frustration. There are some wonderful tutorials, but SL does nothing to properly aggregate and put these tutorials into context.

I wonder what Second Life could do to properly aggregate those tutorials to meet this user’s needs? I suppose long-time wiki writers would answer: use categories and encourage tagging, while looking out for orphans. Any other ideas?

I got a great question from Tom Johnson of I’d Rather Be Writing:

I’m just wondering if you have any thoughts on the WordPress Codex, http://codex.wordpress.org/Main_Page. Yesterday I was looking at this Codex wondering what to make of it all. I think I want to be a contributor, but there are so many topics. It’s chaotic. The organization is like a maize. I don’t know if I should go in there with a wrecking ball and rennovate, or not. Probably 25% of it is outdated. What happens to those outdated pages? Will I offend people if I just delete things that are outdated?

Can you recommend a book or strategy for making sense of massive wikis? Where should I start? I spent a good hour editing a page of it last night that I considered critical. It’s then that I realized this is a huge project and I have no sense of direction. Any insight you can give me would be much appreciated.

With the OLPC wiki, David Farning on the Library list went through the wiki and said he found these categories. It’s quite an accurate content analysis from what I’ve seen, so I was impressed. At the same time, it also helped explain my initial wonderment at how to wrap my arms around the entire wiki – and in fact, it is barely possible to do.

Content
1 Philosophy
2 Contributing
3 Creating
4 Curatoring

5 Projects
Deliverable
In progress
Ideas

6 Management

Once David came up with these categories, he then asked SJ Klein, director of community content and long-time Wikipedian, if he thought the wiki needed structure.

SJ said that the wiki is purposefully without hierarchy – flat, especially for projects, to not force a parent or sibling sense for projects. He also said, however, if you have a specific tree hierarchy in mind, feel free to develop the idea in some temporary space.

So, when working on a large wiki if you have good organization ideas, set them up, and then ask for community feedback. Seems like an appropriate approach to a large wiki.

Other ideas for starting out in a large wiki environment:

While it might seem like it’s a question similar to “how do I get started on a huge writing project?” in my experience, wiki editing has some subtleties due to the collaboration and community vibe already present behind the pages. You have to work harder to figure out that vibe, and then determine your course.

For new people, there’s the whole question of getting a feel for the community so you can start to answer “who am I going to potentially irritate by editing this” and “as a newbie do I have the confidence I’m right?”

So, knowing your role within the wiki community is a first step. You might take a while to get to know who’s there, what their roles are as well, and where you might best fit in. Introduce yourself with your profile page, following the WikiPattern, MySpace – see http://www.wikipatterns.com/display/wikipatterns/MySpace.

Just like a newbie on a writing team, find out if there’s some scut work that you can do to get your feet wet, if needed, to gain the community’s trust.

Deletions are going to bring much more wrath in a wiki situation, I would guess, so they seem risky to do to start out. If you do think something needs deletion, message or email the original author or the big contributors and ask if it’s okay to mark it for deletion. Then, mark it, and hope that someone else (a wiki admin) determines if it should be deleted.

Start small, like tagging, or applying templates. That’ll help you get a feel for the bigger picture.

Let us know your ideas for wrapping your head around a large wiki, we’d love to hear them.